Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 7th International Conference on Biodiversity Conservation and Ecosystem Management Melbourne, Australia.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Ricky M. Bates

Penn State University, USA

Keynote: Strengthening indigenous informal seed systems in Southeast Asia
Biodiversity Congress-2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ricky M. Bates photo
Biography:

Ricky Bates is a Professor of Horticulture in the Department of Plant Science at Penn State University and holds a B.S. and M.S. in Horticulture from West Virginia University, and a Ph.D. in Horticulture from Virginia Tech.  Throughout his career he has aspired to use horticultural science as a tool to: 1) increase the profitability of horticulture enterprises, 2) protect and restore the environment, and 3) alleviate poverty in developing parts of the world.  Dr. Bates’ research, teaching and outreach programs have emphasized sustainable, scalable solutions to problems affecting horticulture value chain development and low-input food production systems.  His work in Southeast Asia focuses on human and institutional capacity building involving implementation of innovative, field-based approaches, grounded in appropriate technology, entrepreneurship, and market engagement. 

 

Abstract:

Seed is a fundamental agriculture input and access to locally adapted, quality seed is an essential component of sustainable crop production. In much of the developing world, informal seed systems, such as farmer-to-farmer exchanges and farmer self-saved seed, are critical components of resource poor farming systems. Indeed, planted seed from this informal system comprise the majority of planted acreage in many regions of the world. This local seed production and distribution facilitates maintenance of crop biodiversity by preserving in situ locally adapted varieties and by broadening the genetic base of production with multiple varieties adapted to specific production systems and micro-climates.  These informal seed systems are also critical for seed and food security during periods of instability or natural disaster, including changing environmental conditions.  A rich diversity of underutilized species function within informal seed systems in Southeast Asia, and represents a valuable resource for the development and improvement of crop species. Current efforts to conserve, improve, and disseminate indigenous species are failing or insufficient. To optimize these informal seed systems, research has been conducted to better understand their germplasm characteristics, distribution pathways and gatekeepers, and to improve local stakeholder access to seed information and value chains. Research and extension projects to conserve and promote neglected and underutilized species within these informal seed systems have resulted in 1) surveys of key indigenous crops and collection of local crop knowledge, 2) training and development of regional community-based seed banking enterprises, 3) seed quality conferences including seed exchange activities, and 4) improved human and institutional capacity, strategically focused on entrepreneurial women. 

 

Biodiversity Congress-2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Salim Momtaz photo
Biography:

Dr Salim Momtaz is Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, School of Environmental and Life Sciences at the University of Newcastle, Australia. He teaches in the area of Sustainable Resource Management. He received his BSc and MSc degrees in Geography from the University of Dhaka, Bangladesh. He obtained a PhD in Sustainable Development from the University of London under a Commonwealth Scholarship. Salim migrated to Australia in 1994. From 1995 to 1998 he taught Geography at Central Queensland University, Australia. He joined the University of Newcastle in 1999 where he has been teaching since. He had a stint in the US as a Visiting Professor teaching Environmental Impact Assessment at Georgetown University, Washington DC. He received Rotary International Ambassadorial Fellowship to teach and conduct research in Bangladesh. Salim’s current research interests include climate change adaptation, environmental governance and social impact assessment. Salim led the team that conducted one of the first social impact assessment studies in Australia titled ‘Independent Social Impact Assessment’. Salim published five books and many articles in international journals. He was a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee, Netherlands Government Research Organization, between 2007 and 2010 and Swiss National Science Foundation in 2017.

Abstract:

Bangladesh is frequently cited as a country that is most vulnerable to climate change. In Bangladesh, most of the adverse effects of climate change occur in the form of extreme weather events, such as cyclone, flood, drought, salinity ingress, river bank erosion and tidal surge, leading to large scale damage to crops, employment, livelihoods and the national well-being. Although it is generally stated that women are relatively more vulnerable than men in the context of climate change, few studies have been conducted to closely examine this statement, especially in Bangladesh. The present study, investigates the structure of women’s livelihoods, livelihood vulnerabilities and coping capacity in the context of climate variability and change in a disaster vulnerable coastal area of Bangladesh. Utilising the concepts of sustainable livelihood framework (SLF) and disaster crunch model (DCM), this study allows for a greater understanding of these issues on the ground. The results show that the distribution of five livelihood capitals (human, natural, financial, social and physical) of women are heavily influenced by several climatic events, such as cyclones that periodically affect the region. Women also face several vulnerabilities in their livelihoods, including income, household assets, health, food security, education, water sources, sanitation and transportation systems, because of ongoing climate change impacts. The results indicate that it is extremely important to instigate strategies to help build the adaptive capacity of women

Keynote Forum

Mini Vijayan

Carmel College, India

Keynote: Two ‘Golden Grains’ from the treasure trove of rich Indian Traditions

Time : 10:30-11:00

Biodiversity Congress-2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mini Vijayan photo
Biography:

Author is an Associate Professor from The Department of Botany, Carmel College, Goa (India). Has a Doctorate Degree in Plant Anatomy & a Post Graduate Diploma in Ecology and Environment. Passionate about Biodiversity concerns and is presently documenting Plant diversity in cultural practices of a specific indigenous community of Indian Peninsula.

 

Abstract:

This research paper is an outcome in part of studying Plant biodiversity in some cultural practices of a specific community - the Kerala Brahmin community - who got settled in Indian Peninsula centuries ago. Literature in this regard is sparse & genuine efforts for documentation were not much. With this background,  studies are in progress  to understand, enlist,  document and preserve the Plant biodiversity  related to the customary practices of the said community. The author herself being a member of the community, her  own experiences & a book written in vernacular language – ‘Antherjanangalude aacharanushtanangal’  (‘Customary rituals & religious rites observed by women of Brahmin community’, 2002) by Late Smt. Cheruvakkara  Parvathy Antherjanam and discussions with the elders in the community have formed the basis of this research.

The ‘Golden grains’ mentioned here are two tropical  grass sps.- locally known in vernacular language as  ‘Navara’ & ‘Chama’. ‘Navara’ is an exclusive & ancient variety of rice, Oryza sativa & ‘Chama’ , Panicum sumatrense , popularly called as Little millet. ‘Navara’ rice has been in cultivation in the state of Kerala (India) for about 2500 years since the time of Susruta, the Indian pioneer in medicine and surgery. Both these grains are intricately linked to the socio- cultural aspects of the community & have great therapeutic value. Life- style changes combined with erratic climate have adversely affected the cultivation of ‘Navara’ & ‘Chama’. A study of the cultural aspects & a review of the high nutritional & therapeutic values are stated in this paper which are aimed at creating awareness with reference to the agricultural crops in question. The study proclaims the need to preserve ‘locale specific’ ancient traditions which are both eco- friendly & sustainable for conserving biodiversity& combating climate change issues. Most significantly the research paper enlightens the role of cultural ethos in safe guarding the Plant biodiversity of a region.

 

  • Biodiversity | Sustainable Development | Climate Change and Global Warming | Ecology and Biodiversity Conservation | Plant and Animal Biodiversity
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Speaker
Biography:

Rafael Moreno-Sanchez has a bachelor degree in forestry from the Chapingo Autonomous University in Mexico. He received his Ph.D. in Natural Resources Management from Colorado State University in the USA.  He has research, teaching and administrative experience including: Researcher for the National Institute for Forest, Livestock, and Agriculture Research (INIFAP) in Mexico; Director of the National Center for Disciplinary Research in Conservation and Improvement of Forest Ecosystems INIFAP (Mexico); Post-Doctoral Fellow with the Organization of American States—SEMARNAP in collaboration with the University of Western Ontario (Canada).  He has been teaching full time since 1996 in the areas of natural resources management, sustainable development, and geographic information science and technology. He is currently Associate Professor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Denver.

 

Abstract:

This study explored the Land Cover (LC) and LC transitions at national level in Mexico using the GlobeLand30 (GL30) land cover 30-meter resolution data sets for the years 2000 and 2010. This information was contrasted against the results of previous national-level Land Cover (LC)/LC Change (LCC) studies and land cover/use digital data sets. According to GL30, Wetlands and Barelands have had the largest decreases in their areas during the 2000-2010 period (-13.33% and -9.26% respectively), while Artificial Surface and Grasslands have had the largest increases (7.38% and 4.00% respectively). Cultivated (1.88%), Forest (-047%), Shrublands (-1.04%), and WaterBodies (-1.21%) show low changes during the 2000-2010 period. From the GL30 estimates of LC extent and percent change, those for the Forest and Cultivated classes were the most similar to those estimates reported in previous studies. The estimates for other LC classes show low agreement with previous studies and with a set of aggregated LC classes created from official digital LC maps. Worth noticing is the small decreased found for the GL30 Forest land cover class during the 2000-2010 period. This suggests a change in processes that in previous decades were reducing the extent of the forest cover in Mexico. The general reduction in LC transitions observed in the 2000-2010 GL30 data supports reports that allocations for some land covers/uses in Mexico have reached maturity and are tending to stabilize. The results of this study points to several needs for further research, such as carrying out assessments of the locational and classification accuracy of the GL30 data sets for Mexico. More specifically, there is a need to closely analyze the extent and changes in the GL30 Artificial Surface and Wetlands LC classes.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Xuehua LIU has her expertise in wildlife conservation and habitat assessment. She has been focusing on the giant panda and its habitat research for a long period. During the recent 10 years, she expanded her interests on other biodiversity species by applying the camera trapping techniques. She used the minded information from the animal pictures recorded by the infrared cameras to analyze the wildlife diversity, animal behaviors and patterns, habitat use, and so on.

Abstract:

Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus) is a protected wildlife species with conservation rank of Grade II. Due to its dangerous characteristics, black bear has been hardly researched for its detailed activity pattern. Currently, the quick development of camera tracking technique has made this research gap possible to be filled. In addition, the gradually serious conflicts between human and black bear call for more information on this animal. The hibernation behavior of black bear also can be a good indicator of climate change. This study is aiming at using camera trapping technique to catch the photos of black bear, mining the detailed information from infrared camera photos, and analyzing the activity pattern of the animal. The camera trapping has been applied in the southern slopes of the Qinling Mountains for more than 5 years. We obtained total 429 camera photos of black bear from 2013 to 2016 and about 1/3rds of them were used for this study after preprocessing the data set. Our results showed that black bears in the Qinling Mountains (1) greatly occur in the daytime, (2) are active in the daytime , and (3) are definitely absent from the trapping in January and February, and occasionally appear in November, December and March, which means the black bears’ hibernation duration is 5 months from November to March generally. (4) The black bears use the forest habitat in a various way among high and low elevation natural forests, secondary forests and man-made forests. All these results can benefit the conservation of Asiatic black bear.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

The natural resources for medicinal plants have unscientifically been exploited forcing rapid depletion in their genetic diversity and biodiversity. Moreover, renewed global interest in herbal medicines may further deplete medicinal plant wealth, as about 95 % collection of medicinal plants for pharmaceutical preparation is being carried out from natural forests. Asparagus racemosus Willd., a member of family Liliaceae, is one of thirty two plant species that have been priorities for cultivation and conservation by the National Medicinal Plant Board of Government of India. Extremely limited research has been carried out on genetic improvement and selection of desired types with higher root production and saponin content, a basic ingredient of medicinal value. The saponin not only improves defense mechanisms and controls diabetes but the roots of this species promote secretion of breast milk, improve lost body weight and considered as an aphrodisiac. It was emphasized to select desired genotypes with sufficient genetic diversity for important economic traits. The evaluation of twenty seed sources of Asparagus racemosus assembled different geographical locations of India reveled high degree of variability for traits of economic importance. The maximum genotypic and phenotypic variance was observed for shoot height among shoot related traits and root length among root related traits. The shoot height, genotypic variance, phenotypic variance, genotypic coefficient of variance, phenotypic coefficient of variance were recorded to be 231.80, 3924.80, 61.26 and 1037.32, respectively, where those for root length were 9.55, 16.80, 23.46 and 41.27, respectively. Maximum genetic advance and genetic gain were obtained for shoot height among shoot-related traits and root length among root-related traits. Index values were developed for all seed sources based on four most important traits, and  Panthnagar (Uttarakhand), Jodhpur (Rajasthan), Dehradun (Uttarakhand), Chandigarh (Punjab), Jammu (Jammu & Kashmir) and Solan (Himachal Pradesh) were found to be promising seed sources.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

The system of Protected Areas/ PA in the northeastern Yakutia began its formation from the end of 60-70-s of the XX century. Resource reserves Ygynnya in Upper Yana River basin, Chaigurgino in Lower Kolyma River area and Jirkogo in the Middle Kolyma area. The Stolb Island in the Lena River Delta and the Sites Pokhodskaya Edoma and Rogovatka in Lower Kolyma area as well as Berelekh Mammoth Cemetery in Lower Indigirka basin were confirmed as Nature Memories. The greatest at that times Reserve of Russia, Ust-Lensky State Nature Reserve, 12, 133 ha, was established in 1985. The PA different types intensification occurred in the middle 90-s of the XX century in northeastern Yakutia. During the order by Yakutia President Michail E. Nikolaev realization, more than 20 PАs including Nature Parks, Resource Reserves and Nature Memorials were established and function from 2014 in Yakutia. In 1990-2000-s, the largest Resource Reserves: Lena Delta, Terpei Tumus, Kytalyk, Kolyma Koren and Bear’s Islands were arranged to protect endangered animal species. The analytical review of literature, found and own data let to evaluate PA role in the northeastern region in Yakutia in biodiversity of vertebrate fauna conservation. Own to protection regime of Ust-Lensky Reserve, the stabilization if marketable fish, birds and mammals population numbers are appeared in the last 35 years. The special importance of PAs had for the conservation, number restoration and range expansions of endangered bird and mammal species along the all near-Arctic Yakutia territory (Siberian crane Grus leucogeranus, Brent goose Branta bernicla, Ross’s gull Rhodostethia rosea, Spectacled Somateria fischeri and Steller’s Polysticta stelleri eiders, Peregrine falcon Falco peregrinus, Gyrfalcon Falco rusticolus, Black-capped marmot Marmota camtschatica, Polar bear Ursus maritimus).       

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

4 amphibian and 3 reptile species inhabit Yakutia. Amphibians. Salamandrella keyserlingii. Northern border of the species range runs along river valleys to Tit-Ary Island (River Lena), in Lower Yana and Indigirka Rivers - to 71° N. In 1970-s, number of Siberian salamanders in summer period was 7-10 individuals for 1 m² in Lena Valley. At the last, the species number decreased and 1-3 individuals for 100 m of coastline were registered at the same region. Rana arvalis inhabits Lena valley and her tributaries. Northern border of the species range runs to 60° N, 124° E. The number is 1—15 individuals for 1/hа. Rana chensinensis is distributed in southern Yakutia by Aldan River and its tributaries valleys. The species goes to 60° N. The number is 15-20 individuals for 1 hа. All these three species are included to Yakutia Red Data Book. Rana amurensis is distributed on all Yakutia from West to East. It was discovered in north from 68° in valleys of rivers Lena, Yana, Indigirka аnd in the most northern point in Upper Yana region(71°N). Reptiles. Lacerta vivipara is widely distributed in taiga zone of Yakutia. The northern border of the species range is 145°E in Indigirka basin. The number in Central Yakutia is low (single individuals were registered). Vipera berus By Lena valley, the species goes to 60° N. The number is 0.4 ind. /hа. All mentioned reptiles included to Red Book of Yakutia. At the last years, Gloydius halys was registered regularly in mouth of Tokko River. Coming to Yakutia of this species is an important evidence of climate warming. Although the reptile and amphibian populations were stable in early 80-s, up to date they are low and reducing, even in such mass to lately as Rana amurensis. Rana arvalis, Rana chensinensis, Gloydius halys go northward.

 

Xiyong Hou

Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.R. China

Title: Monitoring of land use change characteristics in coastal zone in China from 2000 to 2015 by remote sensing techniques
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. HOU has his expertise in remote sensing of coastal changes (mainly focus on land use and land cover change, shoreline change), spatial analysis and spatial modeling, ecosystem assessment and vulnerability assessment in coastal zone. His research group has developed multiple temporal shoreline data of mainland China (1940s, 1960s, 1990, 2000, 2010 and 2014) and revealed the dynamic characters of mainland shoreline since the early 1940s in China. Time series land use and land cover data in coastal China (2000, 2005, 2010 and 2015) have been developed by his research group also. And, taking the coastal China as an example, the spatialization approach of GDP and population put forward by his research group exhibits advantages of significantly improving modeling accuracies especially in areas with extremely high (or low) values.

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Both the climate change and human activities have driven macro changes of land use in coastal zone in China during the past decades. Therefore, more and more attentions have been paid to the spatial-temporal characters of land use change in China’s coastal zone. However, most of these researches concerned with local or regional scales, and therefore, were lack of comparable land use hierarchies and mapping standards, which restricted the sharability of land use data and the comparability of case studies. The purpose of this study is to reveal the spatial-temporal characteristics of coastal land use in China in the early 21st century, and to put forward proposals for coastal zone management. Methodology: Landsat images captured in 2000, 2005, 2010 and 2015 respectively have been collected and visual interpretation method had been adopted for land use mapping in China’s coastal zone. In addition, a land use hierarchy contains 8 first-class and 24 sub-class has been put forward. Findings: Farmland, forest and coastal wetland have been the most widely distributed land use type, whose area ratio came to 31.25%, 28.61% and 22.93% respectively in 2015. From 2000 to 2015, built-up and manmade wetland have increased greatly, whose growth rate came to 41.73% and 39.04% respectively, while farmland, forest, grassland, inland freshwaters, coastal saltwater and unused have been witnessed significant decrease, whose growth rate came to -5.15%, -0.54%, -3.77%, -3.00%, -2.72% and -14.55% respectively. Also, significant spatial-temporal differences of coastal land use change have been observed. Conclusion & Significance: Urbanization and industrialization have been the fundamental driving forces of coastal land use change, as the result, lots of farmland have been occupied by urban growth, and massive coastal saltwater have been reclaimed. Recommendations are made for the coastal zone management to protect the farmland, forest and coastal saltwater. 

Speaker
Biography:

Author is an Associate Professor from The Department of Botany, Carmel College, Goa (India). Has a Doctorate Degree in Plant Anatomy & a Post Graduate Diploma in Ecology and Environment. Passionate about Biodiversity concerns. Presently documenting Plant diversity in cultural practices of a specific indigenous community of Indian Peninsula.

 

Abstract:

Indigenous communities are resourceful in relation to ‘Eco- centric’ knowledge base which is acquired through life experiences in their struggle for survival. Oral transmission of such treasured lessons will be lost forever if not documented & preserved for the posterity. The science behind ancient cultures are now being studied with more urgency as the modern world is getting to understand the need to codify the same. Ethnobotany in part deals with the knowledge about local plants, their uses& their cultural values and one such study is done in this paper, documenting ten species of leafy vegetables which grow in and around homesteads and backyards during the monsoon season in Kerala (South India). The book written in Malayalam language by Late Smt. Parvathy Antherjanam- ‘Antherjanangalude aacharanushtanangal’  (‘Customary rituals & religious rites observed by women of Brahmin community’, 2002) has helped the author to know the local names of the sps. so that the scientific documentation could be done of the same.

‘Pathila’ (‘Pathu’ means ‘Ten’ and ‘Ila’ means ‘Leaf’) is a group of ten wild plants which come up in abundance effortlessly in accordance with the torrential South- west monsoons, which are cooked together as a side dish. In this paper, all ten sps. are documented,  nutritional & medicinal values reviewed. All of them have great nutritious value and some among them can even reduce hyperglycemia. Sauropus androgynus is an example in this regard. In this era of modern food preferences involving expensive exotic ingredients, awareness regarding indigenous edible sps. and their valuable properties which come to the doorsteps of humanity at ‘no cost’, can boost conservation, sustainable utilization and a sustainable economy.

 

  • YRF
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Indian Himalayas with their diverse climatic conditions are home to rare and endangered medicinal flora. One such species is Polygonatum verticillatum Linn., popularly known as Solomon’s Seal. Its mention as an incredible medicinal herb comes from 5000 years ago in Indian Materia Medica as a component of Ashtavarga, a poly-herbal formulation comprising of eight herbs illustrated as world’s first ever rejuvenating nutraceutical food, which is now commercialised in the name ‘Chaywanprash’. It is an erect tall (60 to 120 cm) perennial herb with sessile linear leaves and white pendulous flowers. The species grows well in altitudes ranging from 1600 to 3600 m amsl, and propagates mostly through rhizomes. The rhizomes are potential source for significant phytochemicals like flavonoids, phenolics, lectins, terpenoids, allantoin, diosgenin, β-Sitosterol and quinine. Having profound concentrations of macro and micro nutrients, species has fine prospects of being used as a diet supplement. However due to unscientific and gregarious uprooting, it has been assigned status of ‘Vulnerable’ and ‘Endangered’ according to IUCN Red-List Criteria. Further, destructive harvesting, land use disturbances, heavy livestock grazing, climatic changes and habitat fragmentation have substantially contributed towards anomaly of species. It therefore became imperative to conserve diversity of the species and make judicious use in future research. A Gene Bank was therefore established at High Altitude Herbal Garden of Forest Research Institute, Dehradun, India situated at Chakarata (30042’52.99’’N, 77051’36.77’’E, 2205 m amsl) consisting 149 accessions collected from thirty one geographical locations spread over three Himalayan States of Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand. The present investigations purport towards sampling and collection of divergent germplasm followed by planting and cultivation techniques. The ultimate aim is thereby focussed on analysing genetic diversity of the species, and capturing promising genotypes for carrying out further genetic improvement programme so to contribute towards sustainable development.

 

Speaker
Biography:

I have been conducting researches for over a decade. I did a lot of education campaign and biodiversity conservation in several public schools and universities in Bohol. I joined several wildlife conservation trainings and workshops since I am one of the leading research biologist in Bohol Island State University (BISU). Attending training sessions has further improved my skills, allowing myself to further upgrade the capabilities of the university where I am employed (BISU) and, improving the overall research capabilities of the institutions on the island. My research outputs made me known in the province as a bat expert biologist. I was recognized as an assessor of bats and reptiles in the International Union of Conservation of Nature (IUCN). My expertise attracted collaborations in doing wildlife research in the island. I have the passion to make contribution to the optimum conservation of natural resources in general for the sustenance of human civilization.

 

Abstract:

This study was conducted to determine diversity and distribution of true flies in Bohol and Mindanao, Philippines. Malaise traps were used to collect samples in different habitats. A total of 104 presumptive species of dipterans were identified based on the number of Molecular Operational Taxonomic Units (MOTUs) clustering at 3% threshold. The results showed that diversity of presumptive species of dipteral is higher in Bohol compared to Mindanao with species diversity indices, H’=3.70 and H’=3.26, respectively. The observed difference may be influenced by the heterogenous habitat between sampling sites and the longer periods of sampling. Further, DNA barcodes were then mapped using QGIS. The result showed that 87.5% of the presumptive species belonging to eight families of Diptera were found only in Magsaysay Park, Bohol. These include: Culicidae, Dolichopodidae, Empididae, Mycetophilidae, Sepsidae, Stratiomyidae, Tabanidae, and Tephritidae. This is possibly due to the unique characteristic of habitat in Magsaysay Park, Bohol, hence, a key site for conservation.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Wilbert A. Aureo is a faculty of Forestry and Environmental Science Department, Bohol Island State University, Philippines. He received his first degree from Visayas State University, Philippines in 2013 and awarded with Bachelor of Science in Environmental Management. He obtained his degree in Master of Science in Tropical Ecology from Visayas State University, Philippines in 2016 with major in terrestrial ecosystems management and conservation. His previous works were on soil erosion of a watershed and anurans species as bio-indicator. Currently his research focuses on natural resource management in a karst landscape.

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: The combinations of natural and anthropogenic factors such as climate, geographic ranges and vegetation types (Cueto and Casenave, 1999) are considered to have a significant influence on species distributions and diversity (Mallari, 2009). The pattern of increase in habitat heterogeneity on the structure and composition of vegetation becomes complex if the niche diversity and species diversity increases (Cramer and Willig, 2002; Tews et al., 2004; Gingold et al., 2010; MacClain and Barry, 2010). Moreover, several species of forest anurans are correlated with the quantity and quality of woody debris, litter depth, and over-storey canopy closure (deMaynadier and Hunter, 1995). The Philippines is one of the few countries in the world that is covered by rain forest (Schulte, 2002). It is also considered as one of the world’s mega diverse countries that hosts a large share of endemic flora and fauna (Myer et al., 2000). However, due to the conversion of forests to marginal agriculture, commercial agriculture, and timber plantations, these forest resources are disappearing at an alarming rate (Margraf and Milan, 2004.). Filipino farmers who are poor and lack employment opportunities in the lowland migrate to the upland areas where they cut down secondary forest and practice slash and burn farming (Kummer, 1992). Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Establishment of plots followed the method of Williams (2004). Anurans collection was done at early morning 6:00 – 9:00 am and               evening at 7:00–10:00 pm (Warguez et al, 2013; Mallari et al, 2014). Herbaceous layer, understory, canopy vegetation were identified   (genus level) and counted. Follow the methods of (Woodwall and Willams, 2005). Each CWD was rated on its degree of decomposition ranging from 1 (sound, intact, no rot) to 5 (no structural integrity, soft, powdery). Temperature, rainfall and relative humidity were measured               using thermometer, improvised rain gauge and psychro-dyne respectively. PROC Univariate Test for data normality and heterogeneity was done using Statistical Analysis System version 9.1 (SAS, 2003). PROC GLM was also used to check effect for the anthropogenic             disturbance with habitat condition parameters and species richness and diversity. Finally, Duncan multiple range test (DMRT) was employed to test the factors. Findings: Both the species richness and diversity in the primary forest is significantly (p≤0.05) different from slash-and-burn cultivation (Fig. 2). Frog population increases steadily during natural succession, attaining similar characteristics to those from mature forest after regeneration following slash-and-burn cultivation (Pawar et al., 2004). Meanwhile, when the habitat starts to stabilize its condition (that is conducive to anurans), the frog species starts to increase dramatically. The study also showed that microclimatic parameters, microhabitat, and vegetation structures appear to be the factors influencing habitat condition of anurans which significantly (p≤0.05) affect anurans species richness and diversity. Conclusion & Significance: The results of the study affirm that anthropogenic disturbance alters anurans habitat condition, thereby, affecting its species richness and diversity. It is worth mentioning that there was a considerable reduction (p≤0.05) of anurans species richness and diversity in the primary forest, secondary forest, and slash-and-burn cultivation. Moreover, the study suggests that microclimatic parameters, microhabitat, and vegetation structures appear to be the factors influencing habitat condition of anurans which significantly (p≤0.05) affect anurans species richness and diversity.