Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th International Conference on Biodiversity and Conservation Dubai, UAE.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Charles A Wade

Mott Community College, USA

Keynote: The urban forest: Created biodiversity
Biodiversity Congress International Conference Keynote Speaker Charles A Wade photo
Biography:

Charles A Wade is a Professor of Biology at Mott Community College in Flint, Michigan. He is involved in giving lectures and taking up laboratory classes, such as General Biology (non-science majors), Applied Botany, Environmental Science, General Botany, Michigan Flora, Local Trees and Shrubs, General Ecology and Field Biology, over a two-year period. His research interests include urban forest ecology, urban ecosystem services, changes in the urban forests over time and the sustainability of the urban forest vegetation. He is also interested in helping educate people on the selection of the correct tree for the desired location as well as the health and conditions of the urban and peri-urban forest.

Abstract:

The urban forest is much more diverse than any surrounding natural forest in many parts of the United States. This “Created Biodiversity” is the result of the continuous introduction of new tree species to the urban forest. The three main driving forces behind this urban biodiversity are: Choices of people (based primarily on socioeconomic factors and the desire to plant “something different” in their yards), the heterogeneity of urban habitats where we have formed many new and different habitats that are not necessarily natural environments for native tree species, and the introduction of non-native species which are sometimes potentially invasive and leads to a change in the natural tree composition of the city. This created biodiversity is not a natural assemblage of tree species, but a makeshift community based on human desires and choices. A survey of the urban forest was conducted in 1980 in ten selected Midwest, USA cities. The survey was then replicated in six of these cities. The urban forest composition was then compared to natural forests in the vicinity of the original cities surveyed. It was found that the species richness was much greater in the cities, with 47 to 82 species, than the natural forests in the surrounding area of those surveyed cities which only had 18 to 23 species.

Biodiversity Congress International Conference Keynote Speaker Bozena Mitic photo
Biography:

Bozena Mitic has her expertise in several fields of Botany. At the beginning of her research career, she had a PhD degree in Plant Taxonomy and Systematics. She was involved in some nomenclature investigations, but she has also participated in research on Croatian flora. In the past 10 years, her research activities were extended on invasive alien plants and palynology. Together with colleagues, she developed national standards and the preliminary list of invasive alien plants for Croatia. She permanently works on the mapping and distribution of invasive alien plants in Croatia, and currently, she is on the revision and updating of the list of alien plants in Croatia. She launched modern palynological researches in Croatia and introduced a course on Palynology at the University of Zagreb, which piqued considerable interest among students. Since 2004, she has collaborated with the palynological group at the University of Vienna (Institute of Botany).

Abstract:

Presence of variety of plants is an essential component of biodiversity, which ensures the survival of the whole Earth. The research of plant evolution, phylogeny and richness is a permanent need for the human race. One of the incredibly informative and often neglected disciplines in biodiversity research is palynology, the study of pollen grains and spores. It could provide us evidence on plant history, evolution and phylogeny. The potential of palynology in researching the diversity of plants will be demonstrated by the case study on the large and complex genus Iris L., which consists of about 300 species, widespread in the northern hemisphere. The current classifications, based mainly on morphology and molecular phylogeny, suggest a division of the genus Iris into six or more subgenera and numerous sections and series. Irises grow on diverse natural habitats, especially in the southern and eastern parts of Europe, where on a small geographical range, a variety of climate and ecological conditions resulted in a big diversity of irises. The aim of this study was to investigate pollen features of the genus Iris and to contribute to the better knowledge of their species richness. The results showed that some palynological features could have taxonomical and evolutionary importance, and at least four pollen types could be recognized and taxonomically delimited to the series level. The taxonomic, phylogenetic and evolutionary implications have been evaluated, and the possible pathway of evolution of the genus Iris was suggested (Fig. 1) from the subgenus Limniris to the subgenus Iris. Furthermore, some hotspots of irises and the needs for the conservation of their diversity will be briefly suggested and discussed. To conclude, palynology as a tool for phylogenetic and evolutionary studies can give us a better insight in the evolution and diversity of plants and ensure a better knowledge for their conservation.

  • Sessions: Marine Biodiversity | Forestry | Vulnerable Species | Biodiversity and Food Security | Environmental Pollution & Management
Location: Salon VI & VII
Speaker

Chair

Jim Kielbaso

Michigan State University, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Abdul Rashid Ab Malik

Pulau Banding Foundation, Malaysia

Session Introduction

Anjana Rajput

State Forest Research Institute, India

Title: Conservation of superior phenotypes of teak (Tectona grandis) in central India
Speaker
Biography:

Anjana Rajput is presently engaged as Head of Wildlife Branch in State Forest Research Institute, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, India. She has done her MSc and PhD from Sagar University, India, with specialization in Forest Ecology, having more than 20 years research experience in habitat ecology, wildlife conservation and environmental impact assessment. She is recognized as Functional Area Expert for Ecology & Biodiversity from NABET Quality Council of India, New Delhi. She has published various research papers, technical reports and technical bulletin in national and international peer reviewed journals.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Among Indian tree species, teak is the most valuable timber tree species with lots of variations existing in nature and there is lot of scope for improvement in this species. Individual tree variation is an important source for practical breeding program and to determine breeding objectives of any species information about inheritance patterns need to be combined with the economic values of each trait. Traits selection is the first and the most important step, while starting any improvement programme.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: During present study, existing candidate plus teak trees of Madhya Pradesh, India were evaluated for traits i.e. height, diameter, self- pruning ability, apical dominance, crown diameter, branch thickness, fruit bearing capacity, wood specific gravity of standing tree, heart wood percentage, growth rate and volume. A comparative analysis for different characteristics was done amongst the selected plus tree candidate and trait wise grading was done on the basis observation recorded. Cumulative scoring of candidate plus tree was done based on superior phenotypic characteristics.

Findings: Specific trait-wise trees were identified during present study. Trees of excellent height, girth, clear bole height, ideal circular bole with less tapering, self-pruning ability exist in natural population of Madhya Pradesh, which may be used as reproductive source material for plantation purposes. Wood characteristic like higher specific gravity, higher heartwood percentage which show high inheritance pattern, should be strongly considered along with all the phenotypic characteristics i.e. height, girth, bole form, crown habit, branching pattern etc. They may be used in future tree breeding programmes. A special protection should be provided to conserve those superior genetic resources. It is also requisite to multiply them through original seeds or through micro-propagation technique to sustain the unique creations of the nature.

Batista Abel

Senckenberg Research Institute and Natural History Museum Frankfurt, Germany

Title: Herpetofauna diversity evaluated through an integrative approach
Speaker
Biography:

Batista Abel is a Biologist by profession and nature lover. With 15 years of field experience in Panama, Costa Rica and Colombia, he has conducted several studies of wildlife rescue, monitoring and research. He completed his Undergraduate studies at the Universidad Autónoma de Chiriqui, Panama, Graduate studies at the University of Bogota, Colombia Andes and PhD at the Senckenberg Institute (in association with the Goethe University), Frankfurt, Germany, all focused on the study of amphibians and reptiles. His main interest is bioacoustics, interaction between anuran communities, biogeography and taxonomy of amphibians and reptiles of Panama.

Abstract:

Eastern Panama (EP) is an important biodiversity hot-spot due to its great variety of habitats, high endemism and fast habitat loss. Recently, Panamanian scientists and national authorities have emphasized the urgency of surveys to determine conservation strategies for the herpetofauna in this region. From 2011 to the present, I have repeatedly visited the main mountain ranges in EP, collecting geographical data, specimens and tissue samples for mtDNA barcoding, recording frog calls, and ecological information to assess the status of the herpetofauna in the area. Additionally, we have monitored the population of the critically endangered species Atelopus glyphus in the Pirre area of the Darién National Park. Through an integrative analysis, I could identify 118 amphibians and 156 reptile species present in EP. Additionally, 29 species were not possible to assign to any described species, thus they were catalogued as candidate species, unconfirmed, or cryptic lineages. After this analysis, I have described nine species new to science, revised the taxonomic status of several genera of amphibians (Diasporus, Ecnomiohyla, and Bolitoglossa) and reptiles (Lepidoblapharis and Dactyloa), and synonymized one species in the Pristimantis caryophyllaceus complex. At one locality within the Serranía de Pirre, a population of A. glyphus has decreased dramatically since 2013. An analysis in 2015 confirmed the infection with the Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) fungus in dead specimens. Not all populations in the region are affected at the same level, with those at lower elevation apparently less susceptible to changes in their population structure than those from higher elevations. Unfortunately, A. glyphus and many other species in EP are threatened and disappearing, and for most of them, we have little to no knowledge about their ecology, distribution, and/or habits. As EP is an important area for species diversification and diversity, conservational efforts are required urgently.

Speaker
Biography:

R U Sawaiker is a Research Scholar in the Department of Botany, Goa University, India on Limnological studies of fresh water bodies in Goa. During her research, she has analyzed water samples for physico-chemical and biological parameters from four selected fresh water bodies for a period of two years following standard protocols. It was observed that physical and chemical variables tested during study, were possible drivers of diatom communities. This particular paper deals with use of modern software like OMNIDA GB 5.3 to derive Louis Leclercq IDSE/5 index. Diatoms encountered during study were found to be most powerful ecological indicators of degradation levels of selected water bodies. They are right tools for biomonitoring, as indicator value of diatoms is well accepted and highly used across the continents. It is an ideal means by which progress towards integrated water resources management can be monitored.

Abstract:

Lakes supply water for irrigation, drinking, fisheries, etc., and thus have significant economic and recreational value. In limnetic ecosystem, water quality is influenced by physical, chemical and biological factors. Freshwater communities are very much sensitive to environmental variables. The algal flora constitutes a vital link in the food chain and its productivity depends on water quality at a given time. Diatoms, in particular are of utmost importance, as they are the potential indicators of water quality due to their sensitivity and strong response to many physical, chemical and biological changes. Occurrence of diatom communities in selected fresh water bodies of Goa along with physico-chemical parameters have been studied for a period of two consecutive years and the data has been used in bio-monitoring. Using OMNIDIA GB 5.3 software, Louis Leclercq IDSE/5 index is derived and the level of degradation due to organic and antropogenic pollution has been found out. Findings showed seasonal variations in physico chemical parameters and diatom population. The diversity of diatoms was considerably high in Syngenta, Lotus and Curtorim lakes as compared to Khandola pond. Gomphonema parabolum, Navicula halophila, Navicula microcephala, Navicula mutica were indicating organic pollution in all water bodies. Amphora ovalis, Stauroneis phoenicenteron, Synedra ulna were indicating antropogenic pollution at Syngenta, Lotus and Curtorim lakes while Navicula rhynococephala was indicating antropogenic pollution at Khandola pond. Biomonitoring has been proven to be necessary and hence the importance of diatoms as ecological indicators of water quality has been stressed.

Speaker
Biography:

Khursid A Khan has expertise in Wildlife ecology vis-à-vis anthropogenic impact assessment on protected areas. He has expertise in ungulate ecology especially on Blackbuck, Nilgai and Swamp deer. He has been working with different renowned conservation organizations like Royal Society of Protection of Birds, Bombay Natural History Society and Wildlife Trust of India. Along with this he has been carried out many departmental projects. Currently, he is working in the MoEF&CC Funded project entitled “Assessment of anthropogenic pressure and its impact on forest and grassland ecosystem of Dachigam National Park J&K India”. He is also assessing the impact of transhumance in Dachigam National Park.

Abstract:

We examined the dependence on forest resources among the households of Mulnar village on Dachigam National Park (DNP). Mulnar is one among the 22 villages situated at the boundary of DNP. Data were collected through systematic questionnaire survey of 32 households (46%) randomly selected from the village. It was found that about 91.30% of households were totally or partially dependent on forest for fuel-wood. 31% of these households did not use any alternative sources of energy and were totally dependent on DNP forest for fuel-wood. While only 9% households used Liquid Petroleum Gas (LPG) as an alternative, 17% used LPG along with fuel-wood. 22% households used kerosene stoves and had to supplement it with fuel-wood due to irregular supply of kerosene. 13% of households used electric heaters along with fuel-wood. With per capita fuel-wood consumption of 4.19 kg/day, the average annual fuel-wood consumption was found to be 1.51 metric ton per household. According to household questionnaire survey the average annual fuel-wood collection was found to be lower (1.52 metric tons/household) compared to the measured quantity (5.94 metric tons/household) calculated on the basis of head-loads being taken out of DNP. Moreover 65% of households collected green fodder from the forest for their livestock. Other resources collected from DNP were medicinal plants, honey, vegetables and fish, as well as timber. The harsh climatic conditions of the area and inappropriate supply of alternative fuels are the driving forces of higher fuel-wood consumption. Moreover, dependence on forest resources for subsistence is high due to high unemployment in the village.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Indri (Indri indri) represents a peculiar case among primates because of its impressive howling cries, known as “the song of the indri”. This modulated signal is composed by different vocal notes uttered in a coordinated manner by group members. Loud singing in indris shows evident sex- and individual-specific features and may serve conveying different messages. Indris have been classified as critically endangered by the IUCN (Red List of Threatened Species), mainly because they suffer extremely high pressure, as habitat loss. Due to the increasing anthropic activities that are directly impacting on rainforests, understanding human interaction with the species and their habitat is urgent. For this purpose, Parco Natura Viva, in cooperation with the University of Torino, promoted effective conservation strategies in the Maromizaha forest (Madagascar), focused on the management and preservation of rainforest ecosystems and specific related taxa. Knowledge of how indris communicate generates crucial information, from social organization to demography, from habitat use to genetic fitness. Our research is impacting positively on conservation: the effective monitoring of indri groups and territories is leading to a deeper understanding of how to manage wildlife. Understanding that conservation must have the support of local people in order to be effective, we are working together for developing positive attitudes towards wildlife among the local communities inhabiting 9 villages around the forest, both establishing small infrastructures (e.g. Maromizaha Multipurpose Centre), promoting reforestation (more than 9000 endemic bamboo and forest trees restored), implementing capacity-building activities and developing education at primary and higher level (e.g. 240 schoolchildren equipped with books and stationery). A new Forest Patrol Service has also been established, in collaboration with local traditional authorities and police. As a result of our efforts, on April 28th, 2015 Maromizaha was officially recognized as a New Protected Area (NAP) by the Ministry of Environment, Ecology, Sea and Forests.

Speaker
Biography:

Eromosele J Gold is an Assistant Lecturer in the Department of Crop Science and Horticulture in Federal University, Oye Ekiti, Nigeria. He has a Master’s Degree from the University of Ibadan, Nigeria. Due to his passion for imparting knowledge, he maximized every opportunity to teach and do research in Agriculture with reference in plant biodiversity.

Abstract:

The study was conducted to find out the spatial distribution of weed species diversity, their abundance and species richness on the practical year training program farm of the Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Ibadan. The area of the farm was determined using Garmin etrex H GPS model (Unit ID 3637541523) and confirmed using trigonometry. It was divided into 21 plots of 150 m2 each, leaving a strip of 5 m round for edge effects. Six (1m2) square quadrats (126 in all) were randomly laid on each plot to access the herbaceous flora of the farm. Flora presence and density values were evaluated for Relative Importance Values (RIV), diversity indices and weed relationship to soil type following Kent and Coker (1992); and standard soil testing procedures respectively. A total of fifty three (53) plant species belonging to eighteen (18) families were enumerated. Tridax procumbens had the highest Relative Importance Value (11.73), distantly followed Cynodon dactylon (6.44). Tridax procumbens was prevalent in plots not subjected to crop rotation. Lowest numbers of plants were enumerated on clay soils where Tridax procumbens were mostly prevalent. Margalef index (12.81), Mehinick index (6.959), and Dominance (0.05262) indicated high overall species richness, high species richness in each plot, and low overall dominance respectively.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

The studies took place in the Banco National Park (Abidjan, Ivory Coast) and aimed to search for weather conditions (temperature, rainfall and relative humidity) required for each stage of growth and development of two species of giant African snails: Achatina achatina and Archachatina ventricosa. In order to achieve growth and development, stages of specimens encountered in the samples were identified during different seasons of the year (corresponding to particular climatic conditions). It appears from this study that spats (new-borned) of Achatina achatina are absent in the environment throughout the year. This could be explained by the fact that individuals of this age require for their growth, very specific conditions of temperature, rainfall and relative humidity. This is not the case of Archachatina ventricosa to which weather prevailing in the forest seems to favor their growth, since the spat stage to the juvenile age. Juveniles of species Achatina achatina and Archachatina ventricosa seem fond of climatic conditions during the rainy season (specially the small rainy season) and the short dry season. However, adult individuals of the two species do not seem to accommodate climatic conditions throughout the year in the forest.